It Starts with Risk

Site: NetworkEd
Course: Introduction to Emergency Management
Book: It Starts with Risk
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Date: Thursday, 18 April 2024, 12:16 AM

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It Starts with Risk

1. What is Emergency Management?

Welcome to Module 1: It Starts with Risk


Although you will have had a brief overview of what will be covered in this course and how to navigate through the eBooks that make up the course, we have yet to ask the question 'What exactly is emergency management?'. It is no coincidence that the 4 modules in this course relate to risk, risk readiness and resilience, risk response management, collaboration and coordination and emergency/disaster recovery. These are the founding concepts of managing emergencies. 


Watch the video below (4:57mins) for a better understanding of how this course was designed to provide you with the basics necessary to start your emergency management journey. 

 

 


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Reminder: When you have pressed play on this and any other video in the course, you can click on the 'fullscreen'  icon in the bottom right of the video to expand the screen to fit the device you are using. This is especially helpful if you are on a mobile device! 




1.1. Topic 1, Activity 1

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Answer the following question. Although the activities in this course are not mandatory, they will prepare you to complete the certificate of achievement exam, if you elect to challenge it at the end of the course. 



1.2. Additional Resources

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If you would like to read and find out more about the influence of mindsets in emergency management please check out the article below:

  1. McClure, J. & Sibley, C. (2011). Framing effects on disaster preparation: Is negative framing more effective? The Australian Journal of Disaster and Trauma Studies 2011-1https://www.massey.ac.nz/~trauma/issues/2011-1/mcclure.htm

2. Why Emergency Management


Ever wonder why you are interested in emergency management? Ever wonder why emergency management is important? This topic is about just that. Emergency management is a growing profession and it is because of the interest that people like you have in the profession that drives the improved processes that we learn about and apply today as an emergency manager. 

Watch the video below (7:03mins) to discover why people pursue Emergency Management and then complete the activity on the following page. 

 

 


2.1. Topic 2, Activity 1

Discussion Forum

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After watching the video on the previous page, take a moment to consider the following questions and post your responses into the 'Why I'm interested in emergency management' forum. 



Massey blue lightbulbTip: right click on any hyperlink in the course and 'open in new window' so that you don't have to close the page your on to access the hyperlinked content.


Questions to consider for this discussion: 

  1. What motivated you to take a emergency management course?
  2. What skills do you have that you believe will be transferrable to managing emergencies and disasters?

**Note:  Although the activities in this course are not mandatory, they will prepare you to complete the certificate of achievement exam, if you elect to challenge it at the end of the course. 

2.2. Additional Resources

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If you would like to have a look at a good example of a local level emergency management plan, click on the link below:

  1. Lockyer Valley National Council. (2021). Disaster Management. https://www.lockyervalley.qld.gov.au/our-services/disaster-management 

3. Emergency Management Evolution


Now that we have explored why people might be interested in emergency management, let's take a look at some of the history of Emergency Management from the roots of the cold war to modern day. 

Watch the video below (6:11mins) to learn more about the evolution of emergency management then complete the activity on the next page. 

 

 

3.1. Topic 3, Activity 1


Answer the following question. Although the activities in this course are not mandatory, they will prepare you to complete the certificate of achievement exam, if you elect to challenge it at the end of the course. 



3.2. Additional Resources


For an overview of how one country intends to manage risk, have a look at the link below:

  1. National Emergency Management Agency. (2021). National Hazard Risk Reduction. https://www.civildefence.govt.nz/cdem-sector/the-4rs/reduction/national-hazard-risk-reduction/ 

4. Emergency Management Legislation


In the previous topics, we have looked at what emergency management is, why people are interested in it and a brief history of emergency management. In this topic, we are going to outline a standard approach to Emergency Management legislation and the role of legislation through a discussion of Emergency Management best practice legislation from New Zealand, in the South West Pacific.

Watch the video below (7:12mins) to learn more about emergency management legislation before completing the activity on the next page. 

  

  

4.1. Topic 4, Activity 1


Answer the following question. Although the activities in this course are not mandatory, they will prepare you to complete the certificate of achievement exam, if you elect to challenge it at the end of the course. 



4.2. Additional Resources


If you haven't looked at emergency management legislation, the New Zealand example is a good place start:

  1. Parliamentary Counsel Office.  (2002). Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002. https://legislation.govt.nz/act/public/2002/0033/latest/DLM149795.html?search=ts_act%40bill%40regulation%40deemedreg_civil+defence_resel_25_a&p=1 

For an overview of how risk management is intended to be included in land-use planning, check out the article below:

  1.  Saunders, W.S.A. & Beban, J.S. (2012). Putting R(isk) in the RMA: Technical Advisory Group recommendations on the Resource Management Act 1991 and the implications for natural hazards planning. GNS Science Miscellaneous Series 48, p.57.   https://www.gns.cri.nz/gns/content/download/9867/52967/file/Saunders%20and%20Beban_GNS%20Misc%20Series%2048.pdf 

5. Legal Framework: Role of Legislation in EM


After looking at the legal aspects of emergency management in New Zealand, we are now ready to start thinking about the application of emergency management using the best possible practices. 

Watch the video below (5mins) related to frameworks for emergency management and legislation before completing the activity on the next page. 

 

 


5.1. Topic 5, Activity 1


Answer the following question. Although the activities in this course are not mandatory, they will prepare you to complete the certificate of achievement exam, if you elect to challenge it at the end of the course. 





5.2. Additional Resources


We have provided a selection of documents below if you would like to know more about international and domestic examples of the need for emergency management law and delivery of emergency management within and by governments:

  1. Protection and Inclusion: The Importance of Disaster Law and Policy
  2. NZ Parliament. 2017. Emergency Powers. Parliamentary Practice in New Zealand
  3. Dept of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. 2016. National Security Handbook.  


6. Case Study: Canterbury Earthquakes


Building upon what we have learned about emergency management and the legal considerations let's take a closer look at comprehensive Emergency Management by way of a case study of the Canterbury earthquakes of 2010-11.

Watch the video below (8.29mins) regarding the Canterbury earthquakes of 2010-2011 as a case study. 

 

 


6.1. Topic 6, Activity 1


Answer the following question. Although the activities in this course are not mandatory, they will prepare you to complete the certificate of achievement exam, if you elect to challenge it at the end of the course. 



6.2. Additional Resources


For more in-depth reading on the Christchurch and Canterbury earthquakes, and the responses to them, you can check out the reports below:

  1. Independent Review of the Civil Defence Emergency Management Response to the 22 February 2011 Earthquake.
  2. Lessons from the Canterbury earthquake sequence.  


7. Case Study: Queensland Floods


There are a variety of examples of emergency management that can be used as case studies. However, the Queensland floods of 2011 are still fairly fresh in people's minds and is a good example of the developments that have been made in the emergency management profession. 

Watch the video below (5:13mins) to see the example of Emergency Management developments through the case study of the widespread floods in Queensland before completing the activities on the next two pages. 

 

 

7.1. Topic 7, Activity 1

Discussion Forum


After watching the video on the previous page, take a moment to consider the following questions and post your responses into the 'Response or Recovery Challenges' forum. 



Tip: right click on any hyperlink in the course and 'open in new window' so that you don't have to close the page your on to access the hyperlinked content.


Questions to consider for this discussion: 

  1. What are the most serious hazards your community (or organisation) faces?
  2. How would your community (or organisation) respond to the most significant hazard now?
  3. What issues would come from that Response or Recovery?

**Note: Although the activities in this course are not mandatory, they will prepare you to complete the certificate of achievement exam, if you elect to challenge it at the end of the course. 


7.2. Topic 7, Activity 2


Answer the following question. Although the activities in this course are not mandatory, they will prepare you to complete the certificate of achievement exam, if you elect to challenge it at the end of the course. 



7.3. Additional Resources


More detailed information on the Queensland floods is available in the reports below:

  1. Lockyer Valley Regional Council. 2014.  Temporary Planning Instrument.
  2. Queensland Floods 2010-11.  Resource Base.

8. Risk Analysis


We have just seen the results of disaster through the case studies that we have looked at in the previous topics. It is now time to start thinking about risks and how we analyse risk to prepare for holistically managing those potential emergencies. 

Watch the video below (7:25mins) to learn about holistic risk management before completing the activity on the next page. 

 

 

8.1. Topic 8, Activity 1


Answer the following question. Although the activities in this course are not mandatory, they will prepare you to complete the certificate of achievement exam, if you elect to challenge it at the end of the course. 



9. Case Study: New Orleans

Sometimes the full impact of risk cannot be anticipated. New Orleans experienced this reality during the disastrous Hurricane Katrina which accounted for 1,800 deaths and $billion damage in 2005. Let's look at this tragedy as a case study we can learn from to manage emergency effectively. 

Watch the video below (8:27mins) to explore New Orleans' Hurricane Katrina as a case study example before completing the activity on the next page. 

 

 

9.1. Topic 9, Activity 1


Answer the following question. Although the activities in this course are not mandatory, they will prepare you to complete the certificate of achievement exam, if you elect to challenge it at the end of the course. 



9.2. Additional Resources


The article below provides an engaging and relatively detailed account of Hurricane Katrina and emergency management in relation to it:

  1. National Geographic. 2019.  Hurricane Katrina, Explained.


10. Case Study: Wellington Tsunami Blue Lines


Turning from disaster response, like we just studied with relation to Hurricane Katrina, let's look at community based risk reduction and resilience building. 

We are thankful to have a guest presenter, Dan Nealy, talk about his work as the Community Resilience Manager, Wellington Region Emergency Management Office.

Watch the video below (5:30mins) to learn about South Coast of Wellington for the case study before completing the activity on the following page. 

 

 


10.1. Topic 10, Activity 1


Answer the following question. Although the activities in this course are not mandatory, they will prepare you to complete the certificate of achievement exam, if you elect to challenge it at the end of the course. 



10.2. Additional Resources


For more detail on the case study click on the link below:

  1. Wellington Tsunami Blue Lines Project.


11. End of Module 1


Congratulations! 

trophy for completing module 1

You should have received a Module 1 completion badge. Great work!  

You should now have access to Module 2: Risk Readiness & Resilience



**Note: If for some reason you are not able to access Module 2, make sure that you have viewed each page in this book. 




In addition to being able to access the next module, you will also see the list of discussion forums found within this topic so that you can easily access them throughout the course if you want to.